Tips for Beauty Bloggers | Don’t forget about colour management!

Thursday, January 24, 2013

Did you know that around 35% of computer users browse the internet on Chrome? And in some cases, of that 35%, exactly zero are viewing the same image that you spent so long getting internet-ready: Chrome doesn’t fully colour manage, and there’s no add-on or extension you can download to get it to do so.

Colour profiles

Above image: a Chrome-friendly rendition of YSL’s Spring creme blushers

Below image: what happened the first time I uploaded this image to theNotice!

There’s no perfect fix for this problem, I’m afraid, but it’s a good thing to keep in mind. Colour management lets users see more or less the same colours in an image despite differences in colour profiles, devices, etc., so when a fair few of your readers are seeing something totally different from what you’re seeing –

Well, you might want to double-check your colour settings when you save!

P.S. This is a great page for checking your browser for colour-management!

I am kind of in love with this stairwell.

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

(If I was cool like Charlotte, I would postpone this until tomorrow, take out all the text, and call it a “Wordless Wednesday” post. However, I am not cool like Charlotte, and do not take nearly enough non-beauty photos to sustain a Wordless Wednesdays tag.)

Instead, –

The cut »

Second verse, same as the first (though this one feels a little different.)

Monday, October 22, 2012

You’re going to be seeing a lot of this look this week, and I feel a bit bad about that, but. But.

One of my favourite things about photography is the way that you can take the same subject; the same person, or place, or feeling, and just by photographing the scene differently, the resulting product is changed right down to its core. The casual disregard, the too-easy twisting and tweaking of reality is almost a transcendent action in my eyes; the ability to fully manipulate the viewer’s perception of the scene through techniques and technologies made entirely of human ingenuity without having to make headway on even the smallest of paradigm shifts.

For me, it speaks volumes about the subjectivity of the world, not just in perspective, but in the overwhelmingly transient nature of the individual experience. You can feel it in everything from a magician’s death-defying illusion; to a trick of the light; to the optical aberration, translated metaphorically into every interpersonal interaction, and it shakes us to our bones.

What we see is almost entirely controlled by what is intended for prying eyes, and what we see through a lens even moreso: what we see of each other, then, is obfuscated so efficiently by what we are wanted and want to see. When you can be sixteen or twenty-six; when warm pink bends toward a dusty cyan; when lighting and technique have more sway on the observer than the subject’s own facets, when –

When the human experience is embodied with such fantastic intensity, what then could be more sublime?

Tips for beauty bloggers: Let’s talk curves.

Monday, March 26, 2012

The Photoshop kind, not the body kind. (But hey, if you want to talk humans-with-curves in the comments, you go right ahead. The world could use a little less skinny ’round here! Just keep it PG-13, you hear?)

Long story short, I’ve been working on a Clinique Quickliner Intense review, and I’m halfway done, but I’m really, really tired. So, you’ll have to wait until Tuesday for that, but this: this, you can have now.

A sad, lonely, unedited March snowfall photo.

The basics

This isn’t actually an in-depth curves tutorial; rather, I feel like I need to periodically remind people that they exist. They’re ridiculously easy (and ridiculously handy), and can be used in anything from vignetting, to increasing contrast and brightening up photos, to doing that hipster-faded thing.

Curves – brighter (think of it like a screen layer), darker (think of it like a multiply layer).

Unless you’ve gone and inverted your axes, pulling the curve upwards is going to add brightness, an S curve is going to increase contrast, and pulling the curve downwards will increase shadows. Dragging the endpoints inwards will add a more harsh change; think of it as brightening or darkening the shadows, rather than the midpoints. A curve in which the lower point is farther from the x=y line than the upper point will decrease contrast, doing that old-photograph thing that people seem to be into at the moment.

Curves – more contrast; less.

Keep reading! »

Airbrushing eye looks | taming brows, erasing dark circles, and perfecting your eye makeup

Monday, August 8, 2011

Before you ask, yes, I will eventually get around to discussing how to take eye of the day photos. For now, though, I hope this Photoshop how-to will suffice!

At twelve minutes and a bit, I don’t think it’s too terribly long, but in case you need some persuading to watch, here’s what it covers:

  • How to Photoshop a portfolio-ready eye shot
  • Perfecting brows by hand (and cleaning up stray hairs with the healing brush)
  • Creating depth with the burn tool
  • Erasing dark circles

But I’m sure you didn’t really need that extra convincing, right? ;)

Wait! Before you go – any interest in learning how to draw in false lashes? I’d be more than happy to do a quick (five-minutes-or-less, I promise) tutorial on creating the perfect fringe of lashes, just let me know!

As always, thanks for watching, reading, and commenting :)

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