Airbrushing eye looks | taming brows, erasing dark circles, and perfecting your eye makeup

Monday, August 8, 2011

Before you ask, yes, I will eventually get around to discussing how to take eye of the day photos. For now, though, I hope this Photoshop how-to will suffice!

At twelve minutes and a bit, I don’t think it’s too terribly long, but in case you need some persuading to watch, here’s what it covers:

  • How to Photoshop a portfolio-ready eye shot
  • Perfecting brows by hand (and cleaning up stray hairs with the healing brush)
  • Creating depth with the burn tool
  • Erasing dark circles

But I’m sure you didn’t really need that extra convincing, right? ;)

Wait! Before you go – any interest in learning how to draw in false lashes? I’d be more than happy to do a quick (five-minutes-or-less, I promise) tutorial on creating the perfect fringe of lashes, just let me know!

As always, thanks for watching, reading, and commenting :)

Tips for beauty bloggers: editing product photos

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Ugh, I probably shouldn’t film while in a wheat-coma in the future :P Anyhow; enjoy the video, and don’t forget that you can watch fullscreen in HD! (Highly encouraged. Highly.)

Tips for beauty bloggers: Photoshopping faces

Monday, June 13, 2011

After (too long) of a delay, I’m pleased to introduce our next instalment in Tips For Beauty Bloggers. Whether you’re a fellow blogger, a photography fiend, or just another Joe the Plumber looking to clean up some photos, I hope you enjoy this post!

I hemmed and hawed over whether or not to do this as a video, and in the end, I decided it would be best to. I’ve uploaded it to Vimeo (we’re still avoiding YouTube, at least for now) in HD format, so I’d definitely encourage you to view it fullscreen - seriously, you won’t be disappointed.

(Yes, I’m still childishly amused by the wonders of the internet. Now shh; less mocking and more watching!)

If you’ve enjoyed this tutorial, please link back to this post. A project like this one takes a lot of time and effort, so I’d really appreciate it if you could refrain from embedding the video on your own sites. Thanks!

(Read more…)

The Infinity Effect: comparison photos

Friday, May 20, 2011

I promised some comparison shots to follow Wednesday’s Infinity Effect How-To, so here they are!

All images here are un-photoshopped – save for cropping and resizing – and feature the infinity effect backdrop on the right. (Left = lightbox). They’ve all been taken in indirect sunlight without flash support and enlarge to ~1000px if you click on them. (If this was a product review post or something, I’d also tweak the colour balance and curves of the image, which is why they might look a little different from usual.)

Small objects

I snapped a few shots of Clinique’s new Moisture Surge Tinted Moisturizer to show this one off, and it’s with your small objects that you’ll see the least difference between the two. (Clinique foundation bottles are about 3″/8cm tall.)

Tonally, they’re a little different, but probably won’t see much of a difference between a lightbox and an infinity effect backdrop if you’re just photographing small products. (The lightbox does produce slightly softer lighting, though, as it sort of bounces around off its sides.)

Large objects

Once things get a little taller, I think the differences become more noticeable – with soft sunlight coming in from my window at a bit of an angle, the lightbox sort of forms shadows within itself.

The product featured below is the Redken Nature’s Rescue shampoo, which is about 7″/16cm tall. Here are the photos as they’d appear from the camera:

Read more…

Tips for beauty bloggers: the infinity effect

Wednesday, May 18, 2011

I had fully intended to make a larger lightbox (and create a tutorial with it) when I realized that, well, there’s simply no need. I don’t actually use my lightbox as a lightbox – moreso as a backdrop than anything else – so I figured, what the heck, right?

Anyhow. I’m calling it “The Infinity Effect,” because that’s what it’s for and I’m dazzlingly uncreative.

Choose a lightbox if: you want something that can be set up with artificial lights

Choose the infinity effect if: you want to shoot larger objects, you want something very low-effort, or you always shoot in natural light

1. Gather your materials.

That is: a box, a large pair of scissors, a pen or pencil, packing tape, and white (or black, or grey) bristol board.

The box doesn’t have to be anything fancy, though you could certainly choose a more aesthetically appealing box if you wanted! I’m just using a canola oil box from the market – want not, waste not, right? If you haven’t any packing tape, feel free to use plenty of scotch or masking tape instead, or even just liberal amounts of glue.

2. Prep the paper

Keep on reading!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...